Giddiness evaluation

WHAT IS GIDDINESS?

Giddiness/Dizziness is the feeling of being lightheaded, woozy, or unbalanced. It affects the sensory organs, specifically the eyes and ears, so it can sometimes cause fainting. Dizziness isn’t a disease, but rather a symptom of various disorders.

Dizziness is common and its underlying cause usually isn’t serious. Occasional dizziness is not something to worry about. However, you should call your doctor immediately if you’re experiencing repeated episodes of dizziness for no apparent reason or for a prolonged period.

Common causes of dizziness include a migraine, medications, and alcohol. It can also be caused by a problem in the inner ear, where balance is regulated.

Dizziness is often a result of vertigo as well. The most common cause of vertigo and vertigo-related dizziness is benign positional vertigo (BPV). This causes short-term dizziness when someone changes positions quickly, such as sitting up in bed after lying down.

Dizziness and vertigo can also be triggered by Meniere’s disease. This causes fluid to build up in the ear with associated ear fullness, hearing loss, and tinnitus. Another possible cause for dizziness and vertigo is an acoustic neuroma. This is a noncancerous tumor that forms on the nerve that connects the inner ear to the brain.

Several drugs have been used to decrease the spinning sensation, control nausea and vomiting and allay the anxiety caused by giddiness. A list of some of the commonly used drugs is given below. However, it is again emphasized that treating the underlying cause of genesis of giddiness will be more beneficial to the overall recovery of the patient than suppressing the symptoms.

Most giddiness suppressing medicines are advised to be taken for short durations only during the acute attack. These medicines should be stopped after the acute episode as when they are given for prolonged spells, they interfere with recovery initiated by the central nervous system called central compensation.